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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 103439, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/103439
Research Article

Large-Scale Atmospheric Step-and-Repeat UV Nanoimprinting

1Department of Nanoscience and Nanoengineering, Waseda University, 3-4-1, Okubo, Shinjuku, Tokyo 169-8555, Japan
2Nano Processing System Division, Toshiba-Machine Co., Ltd., 2068-3 Ooka, Numazu, Shizuoka 410-8510, Japan
3Institute for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology, Waseda University, 513 Waseda Tsurumaki-cho, Shinjuku, Tokyo 162-0041, Japan

Received 25 November 2011; Accepted 14 July 2012

Academic Editor: Kyoung Moon

Copyright © 2012 Kentaro Ishibashi et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Step-and-repeat UV nanoimprinting for large-scale nanostructure fabrication under atmospheric pressure was realized using high-viscosity photocurable resin and a simple nanoimprinting system. In step-and-repeat UV nanoimprinting under atmospheric pressure using low-viscosity resin, large-scale nanostructure fabrication is very difficult, due to bubble defects and nonuniformity of the residual layer. To minimize bubble defects and nonuniformity of the residual layer, we focused on the damping effects of photocurable resin viscosity. Fabrication of 165 dies was successfully demonstrated in a 130×130 mm2 area on an 8 in silicon substrate by step-and-repeat UV nanoimprinting under atmospheric pressure using high-viscosity photocurable resin. Nanostructures with widths and spacing patterns from 80 nm to 3 μm and 200 nm depth were formed using a quartz mold. Bubble defects were not observed, and residual layer uniformity was within 30 nm ±10%. This study reports on simple step-and-repeat UV nanoimprinting under atmospheric pressure using high-viscosity photocurable resin, as a very widely available method for large-scale mass production of nanostructures.