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Journal of Nanotechnology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 212486, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/212486
Research Article

Investigating the Effect of In Ovo Injection of Silver Nanoparticles on Fat Uptake and Development in Broiler and Layer Hatchlings

1Department of Veterinary Clinical and Animal Sciences, University of Copenhagen, Groennegaardsvej 7, 1870 Frederiksberg C, Denmark
2Department of Animal Nutrition and Feed Science, Warsaw University of Life Sciences, Ciszewskiego 8, 02-786 Warsaw, Poland

Received 9 March 2012; Accepted 3 September 2012

Academic Editor: Steven Li

Copyright © 2012 Lane Pineda et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Silver nanoparticles (AgNano) as carrier of available oxygen (O2) and with high surface reactivity may increase O2 consumption, enhance fat uptake (FU), and stimulate growth and development. The objective was to investigate the effects of in ovo injection of AgNano on the metabolic rate (O2 consumption, CO2 production, and heat production, HP), fat uptake, and the development of broiler and layer hatchlings. AgNano concentrations (50, 75, and 100 mg/kg) were injected in ovo at day 1 of incubation to different breeds of broiler and layer chicken embryos. Oxygen consumption and subsequently FU did not increase linearly following AgNano treatment. FU was lower in hatchlings treated with 50 and 100 mg AgNano/kg, but surprisingly not in hatchlings treated with 75 mg AgNano/kg. Interestingly, the difference in FU between treatments was not reflected in hatchling development. The results indicated that AgNano affected metabolic rate and FU; however, it did not influence the development of hatchlings. This suggests that in ovo injection of AgNano reduces the need to use yolk fat as an energy source during embryonic development and consequently the remaining fat in the residual yolk sac may provide a potent source of nutritional reserves for chicks of few days after hatching.