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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 519563, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/519563
Research Article

Inhibition of Glutathione and Thioredoxin Metabolism Enhances Sensitivity to Perifosine in Head and Neck Cancer Cells

Free Radical and Radiation Biology Program, Department of Radiation Oncology, Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA

Received 2 March 2009; Accepted 17 June 2009

Academic Editor: Paul Harari

Copyright © 2009 Andrean L. Simons et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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