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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 201026, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/201026
Review Article

Myeloid Cells in the Tumor Microenvironment: Modulation of Tumor Angiogenesis and Tumor Inflammation

Moores UCSD Cancer Center, University of California, San Diego, 3855 Health Sciences Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093-0912, USA

Received 31 October 2009; Revised 9 February 2010; Accepted 2 March 2010

Academic Editor: Debabrata Mukhopadhyay

Copyright © 2010 Michael C. Schmid and Judith A. Varner. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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