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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 689018, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/689018
Review Article

Progress on Antiangiogenic Therapy for Patients with Malignant Glioma

1Brain Tumor Neuro-Oncology Center, Neurological Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA
2Department of Solid Tumor Oncology, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA
3Department of Cancer Biology, Lerner Research Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, Ohio 44195, USA

Received 21 November 2009; Revised 25 January 2010; Accepted 11 February 2010

Academic Editor: Arkadiusz Dudek

Copyright © 2010 Manmeet S. Ahluwalia and Candece L. Gladson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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