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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 252675, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/252675
Research Article

Epidemiology of Cigarette and Smokeless Tobacco Use among South Asian Immigrants in the Northeastern United States

1UMDNJ-School of Public Health and The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 335 George Street, Suite 2100, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
2UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 125 Paterson Street, Room 2300, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
3UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, Room 5569, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-2681, USA
4UMDNJ-School of Public Health, 335 George Street, Suite 2100, New Brunswick, NJ 08903, USA
5UMDNJ-Robert Wood Johnson Medical School and The Cancer Institute of New Jersey, 195 Little Albany Street, Room 2002B, New Brunswick, NJ 08903-2681, USA

Received 31 December 2010; Accepted 2 March 2011

Academic Editor: Aditi Chatterjee

Copyright © 2011 Cristine D. Delnevo et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

As the most preventable cause of death in the world today, understanding tobacco use among one of the fastest growing ethnic/racial groups is warranted. We explore cigarette and smokeless tobacco (SLT) use among South Asians in NJ and the Northeast using the Tobacco Use Supplement to the Current Population Survey. Overall, tobacco use rates among South Asians were similar or lower than the population. However, in NJ, South Asian males had the highest SLT rate (2.7%) and in the Northeast, White (AOR = 5.8, 95%  CI = 3.7–9.4) and South Asian males (AOR = 4.0, 95%  CI = 1.5–10.6) had significantly higher odds of current SLT use relative to non-White males. Tobacco use among South Asians was not homogeneous; Pakistanis are overrepresented among cigarette smokers while Indians are overrepresented among SLT users. Given the differential tobacco use among and within South Asian, disaggregating data to understand tobacco use behaviors is necessary to develop effective interventions for tobacco cessation.