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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 125278, 25 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/125278
Review Article

Integrin-Mediated Cell-Matrix Interaction in Physiological and Pathological Blood Vessel Formation

Center for Molecular Medicine, Department of Vascular Matrix Biology, Excellence Cluster Cardio-Pulmonary System, J. W. Goethe University Hospital, Theodor-Stern-Kai 7, Building 9 b, 60590 Frankfurt, Germany

Received 25 May 2011; Accepted 15 July 2011

Academic Editor: Debabrata Mukhopadhyay

Copyright © 2012 Stephan Niland and Johannes A. Eble. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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