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Journal of Oncology
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 794172, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/794172
Research Article

Lack of Efficacy of Combined Antiangiogenic Therapies in Xenografted Human Melanoma

Department of Biomedical Sciences, Ontario Veterinary College, University of Guelph, Guelph, ON, Canada N1G 2W1

Received 30 April 2011; Revised 5 August 2011; Accepted 5 August 2011

Academic Editor: Kalpna Gupta

Copyright © 2012 Una Adamcic et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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