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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 651936, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/651936
Clinical Study

Mindfulness Intervention for Stress Eating to Reduce Cortisol and Abdominal Fat among Overweight and Obese Women: An Exploratory Randomized Controlled Study

1Osher Center for Integrative Medicine, Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94115, USA
2Department of Psychology, Indiana State University, Terre Haute, IN 47809, USA
3California National Primate Research Center, University of California, Davis, CA 95616, USA
4Department of Pediatrics, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
5Department of Psychiatry, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA
6Department of Medicine, University of California, San Francisco, CA 94143, USA

Received 12 March 2011; Accepted 1 June 2011

Academic Editor: Renato Pasquali

Copyright © 2011 Jennifer Daubenmier et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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