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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 838934, 2 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/838934
Editorial

Metabolic Effects of Bariatric Surgery

1Department of Surgery, University of Genoa School of Medicine, 16132 Genoa, Italy
2University of Pisa, 56126 Pisa, Italy
3University of Freiburg, 79085 Freiburg, Germany
4Department of Surgery, Pennsylvania State University, Hershey, PA 17033, USA

Received 7 December 2011; Accepted 7 December 2011

Copyright © 2011 Francesco Saverio Papadia et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.


Obesity and its associated comorbidities are an ongoing health care problem worldwide [1].It is well known that obese patients are at increased risk for the development of diabetes, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, sleep apnea, osteoarthritis, and other degenerative diseases [2]. Bariatric surgery has demonstrated to achieve, on top of significant weight reduction, also long-term control of metabolic comorbidities in morbidly obese patients [3].

In particular, glycemic control of morbidly obese diabetic patients improves markedly after surgery, and bariatric surgery has been recently proposed as a treatment for diabetic, obese class 1 patients in a statement by the International Diabetes Federation [4]. Nonetheless, most of the evidence on the benefits of bariatric surgery in morbidly obese diabetic patients available today is based on retrospective reviews, and even the few prospective trials have some limitations [5].

A recently published, very critical review [6] states that bariatric surgery does not “cure” diabetes. In addition, whether this acute “cure” will continue to be a long-term benefit in reducing cardiovascular disease morbidity and mortality as well as cancer mortality for patients with type 2 diabetes has to be documented in future studies. Therefore, before large-scale application of bariatric surgery to nonbariatric candidates, outside of controlled clinical trials, can be considered or recommended, sufficient long-term data on outcome and complications has to be collected and reported.

In this issue, a wide spectrum of topics have been addressed, ranging from preclinical to clinical reports. Particular attention has been focused on long-term reports.

Bariatric surgery with a metabolic indication, “metabolic surgery”, is here to stay. It is our duty to ensure that its development is driven by sound evidence and good clinical judgement.

Francesco Saverio Papadia
Monica Nannipieri
Wojciech Konrad Karcz
Robert N. Cooney

References

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