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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 868305, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/868305
Review Article

High-Intensity Intermittent Exercise and Fat Loss

School of Medical Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, NSW 2052, Australia

Received 3 June 2010; Accepted 5 October 2010

Academic Editor: Eric Doucet

Copyright © 2011 Stephen H. Boutcher. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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