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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 492410, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/492410
Research Article

A Comparison between Atlantic Canadian and National Correction Equations to Improve the Accuracy of Self-Reported Obesity Estimates in Atlantic Canada

1School of Nursing, Memorial University, St. John's, NL, Canada A1B 3V6
2Surveillance and Epidemiology Unit, Cancer Care Nova Scotia, Halifax, NS, Canada B3H 2Y9
3Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Control, Public Health Agency of Canada, Ottawa, ON, Canada K1A 0K9

Received 10 September 2012; Accepted 9 November 2012

Academic Editor: Yvon Chagnon

Copyright © 2012 Cynthia L. Murray et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Objectives. To determine whether obesity correction equations for the Canadian general population, which are dependent on the prevalence of obesity, are appropriate for use in Atlantic Canada, which has the highest obesity rates in the country. Also, to compare the accuracy of the national equations to equations developed specifically for the Atlantic Canadian population. Methods. The dataset consisted of Canadian Community Health Survey (CCHS) 2007-2008 data collected on 17,126 Atlantic Canadians and a subsample of adults, who provided measured height and weight (MHW) data. Atlantic correction equations were developed in the MHW subsample. Using separate multiple regression models for men and women, self-reported body mass index (BMI) was corrected by multiplying the self-reported estimate by its corresponding model coefficient and adding the model intercept. Paired t-tests were used to determine whether corrected mean BMI values were significantly more accurate (i.e., closer to measured data) than the equivalent means based on self-reported data. The analyses were repeated using the national equations. Results. Both the Atlantic and the national equations yielded corrected obesity estimates that were significantly more accurate than those based on self-report. Conclusion. The results provide some evidence of the generalizability of the national equations to atypical regions of Canada.