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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 845480, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/845480
Review Article

Copy Number Variants in Obesity-Related Syndromes: Review and Perspectives on Novel Molecular Approaches

Human Genome and Stem Cell Center, Department of Genetics and Evolutionary Biology, Institute of Biosciences, University of Sao Paulo, 277 Rua do Matao, Rooms 204 and 209, 05508-090 Sao Paulo, SP, Brazil

Received 30 August 2012; Accepted 9 October 2012

Academic Editor: David Allison

Copyright © 2012 Carla Sustek D'Angelo and Celia Priszkulnik Koiffmann. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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