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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 147589, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/147589
Research Article

Determinants of Fast Food Consumption among Iranian High School Students Based on Planned Behavior Theory

1Department of Health Education and Health Promotion, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
2Kashani Hospital, Shahrekord University of Medical Science, Shahrekord, Iran
3Food Security Research Center, Department of Community Nutrition, School of Health & Nutrition, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran
4Department of Health Education and Health Promotion, Yazd Shahid Sadoughi University of Medical Sciences, Yazd, Iran
5Department of Statistics and Epidemiology, School of Health, Isfahan University of Medical Sciences, Isfahan, Iran

Received 12 March 2013; Revised 18 June 2013; Accepted 18 June 2013

Academic Editor: Jennifer A. O'Dea

Copyright © 2013 Gholamreza Sharifirad et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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