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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 298024, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/298024
Research Article

Lifestyle and Dietary Factors Associated with the Evolution of Cardiometabolic Risk over Four Years in West-African Adults: The Benin Study

1TRANSNUT, WHO Collaborating Centre on Nutrition Changes and Development, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, University of Montreal, CP 6128, Succursale Centre-Ville, Montréal, QC, Canada H3C 3J7
2Department of Health Promotion, Regional Institute for Public Health, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 918 Cotonou, Benin
3United Nations International Children's Emergency Fund, BP 1146 N'Djamena, Chad
4Bioversity International, West and Central Africa, c/o IITA, 08 BP 0932 Cotonou, Benin
5Department of Health and Environment, Regional Institute for Public Health, University of Abomey-Calavi, 01 BP 918 Cotonou, Benin

Received 23 December 2012; Accepted 6 February 2013

Academic Editor: Renato Pasquali

Copyright © 2013 Charles Sossa et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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