Table 3: Relative risk for deterioration of cardiometabolic risk factors over the follow-up period after adjusting for age and sex ( ).

VariablesDeterioration of cardiometabolic risk
Model 1
RR (CI 95%)
Model 2
RR (CI 95%)

Sex
 Women11
 Men0.93 (0.51–1.67)0.41 (0.18-0.95)
Age (years)
45 11
 25–34 0.06 (0.03–0.14)0.40 (0.01–0.11)
 35–44 0.29 (0.16–0.53)0.14 (0.06–0.33)
Location
 Large city11
 Rural area 0.56 (0.27–1.18)0.54 (0.19–1.53)
 Small city 0.39 (0.21–0.74)0.40 (0.16–1.02)
Income score
 High income11
 Low income 0.42 (0.19–0.92)0.57 (0.2–1.63)
 Medium income 0.75 (0.39–1.44)1.18 (0.51–2.7)
Education
 High school11
 No schooling 0.63 (0.27–1.47)0.53 (0.17–1.66)
 Primary school 1.05 (0.53–2.11)1.21 (0.48–3.05)
Sedentary time
 High tertile1
 Low tertile 0.04 (0.01–0.13)
 Medium 0.24 (0.11–0.55)
Physical activity
 Activea1
 Inactive 6.29 (2.97–13.35)
Food score
 High tertile1
 Low tertile 5.61 (1.91–16.41)
 Medium tertile 2.02 (0.80–5.07)
Alcohol intake
 Heavy drinking1
 None 0.51 (0.16–1.64)
 Moderate drinking 0.72 (0.25–2.06)
Smoking
 Current smoking1
 Non smoker 0.14 (0.02–0.85)
 Former smokers 0.34 (0.05–2.29)

Model 1: Income score + location + education level.
Model 2: Income score + location + education level + healthy food score + lifestyle components.
aInactive: <30 min/d moderate/vigorous activity, active: 30 min/d moderate/vigorous activity.