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Journal of Obesity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 827674, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/827674
Review Article

Heath Beliefs of UK South Asians Related to Lifestyle Diseases: A Review of Qualitative Literature

1School of Psychology, Faculty of Life Sciences and Computing, London Metropolitan University, 166-220 Holloway Road, London N7 8DB, UK
2Department of Non-communicable Disease Epidemiology, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London WC1E 7HT, UK

Received 12 October 2012; Accepted 26 December 2012

Academic Editor: Jamy D. Ard

Copyright © 2013 Anna Lucas et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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