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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2010 (2010), Article ID 274317, 7 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2010/274317
Research Article

Inhibition of Methylglyoxal-Mediated Protein Modification in Glyoxalase I Overexpressing Mouse Lenses

1Department of Ophthalmology & Visual Sciences, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, OH 44106, USA
2Mason Eye Institute, University of Missouri, Columbia, MO 65212, USA

Received 1 March 2010; Accepted 1 June 2010

Academic Editor: Mark Petrash

Copyright © 2010 Mahesha H. Gangadhariah et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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