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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 278135, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/278135
Review Article

The Psychological Challenge of Late-Life Vision Impairment: Concepts, Findings, and Practical Implications

Department of Psychological Aging Research, Institute of Psychology, Heidelberg University, Bergheimer Straβe 20, 69115 Heidelberg, Germany

Received 26 December 2012; Accepted 15 March 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew G. Lee

Copyright © 2013 Hans-Werner Wahl. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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