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Journal of Ophthalmology
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 352917, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/352917
Research Article

Sustained and Transient Contributions to the Rat Dark-Adapted Electroretinogram b-Wave

Department of Optometry and Vision Sciences, University of Melbourne, 4th Floor, 162 Alice Hoy Building, Monash Road, Parkville, VIC 3010, Australia

Received 31 October 2012; Accepted 31 January 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew G. Lee

Copyright © 2013 Trung M. Dang et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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