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Journal of Robotics
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 590479, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/590479
Research Article

Partition Learning for Multiagent Planning

1Vehicle Dynamics Lab and Center for Collaborative Control of Unmanned Vehicles, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 6141 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740, USA
2Vehicle Dynamics Lab, Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of California, Berkeley, 6141 Etcheverry Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720-1740, USA

Received 30 March 2012; Revised 27 July 2012; Accepted 10 August 2012

Academic Editor: Duško Katić

Copyright © 2012 Jared Wood and J. Karl Hedrick. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Automated surveillance of large geographic areas and target tracking by a team of autonomous agents is a topic that has received significant research and development effort. The standard approach is to decompose this problem into two steps. The first step is target track estimation and the second step is path planning by optimizing directly over target track estimation. This standard approach works well in many scenarios. However, an improved approach is needed for the scenario when general, nonparametric estimation is required, and the number of targets is unknown. The focus of this paper is to present a new approach that inherently handles the task to search for and track an unknown number of targets within a large geographic area. This approach is designed for the case when the search is performed by a team of autonomous agents and target estimation requires general, nonparametric methods. There are consequently very few assumptions made. The only assumption made is that a time-changing target track estimation is available and shared between the agents. This estimation is allowed to be general and nonparametric. Results are provided that compare the performance of this new approach with the standard approach. From these results it is concluded that this new approach improves search and tracking when the number of targets is unknown and target track estimation is general and nonparametric.