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Journal of Renewable Energy
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 878329, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/878329
Review Article

Material Demands for Storage Technologies in a Hydrogen Economy

Grupo de Materiales Carbonosos y Medio Ambiente, Departamento de Química Inorgánica, Universidad de Alicante, Apartado 99, 03080 Alicante, Spain

Received 31 October 2012; Accepted 5 January 2013

Academic Editor: Hikmet Esen

Copyright © 2013 M. Kunowsky et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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