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Spectroscopy
Volume 24 (2010), Issue 3-4, Pages 317-324
http://dx.doi.org/10.3233/SPE-2010-0438

Towards instantaneous quantitative fluoroimaging drugs determination in body fluids with no added reagents

Natalia V. Strashnikova,1 Arcady P. Gershanik,1 Nona Papiashvili,1 Daniel Khankin,2 Rivka Cohen-Luria,1 Shlomo Mark,2 Yehoshua Kalisky,3 and Abraham H. Parola1,4

1Department of Chemistry, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, Israel
2Department of Software Engineering, Shamoon College of Engineering, Beer Sheva, Israel
3Chemistry Department, Nuclear Research Center Negev, Beer Sheva, Israel
4Department of Chemistry, Ben Gurion University, Beer Sheva, P.O.Box 653, Beer Sheva, 84105, Israel

Copyright © 2010 Hindawi Publishing Corporation. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Abstract

Our objective is to develop a simple monitoring technique for rapid, sensitive and quantitative drugs detection in body fluids, with no reagent added and no need for qualified professionals. The user-friendly automatic Fluo-imager will (a) measure the full-range 3D fluorescence map of the inserted fluid sample, (b) determine the chemical nature and concentration of the drugs and (c) transfer the results through internet to the diagnosis center. For these goals the fluorescence measurement data will be examined by neuronal network-pattern recognition software. The software identifies the chemical nature and the appropriate concentration of the drug by comparison of the obtained 3D pattern with the contents of the data bank. One of the problems in the approach under consideration is the high optical density of body fluids in the UV region, which raises difficulties in the fluorescence measurements. In this paper, we have attempted to overcome this problem by means of preliminary dilution. Nevertheless, the problem of subtraction of the fluid fluorescence background still needs to be addressed.