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Journal of Tropical Medicine
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 415057, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/415057
Review Article

Genetic Diversity of Toll-Like Receptors and Immunity to M. leprae Infection

1Department of Microbiology, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA
2College of Medicine, University of Illinois, Urbana, IL 61801, USA

Received 26 August 2011; Accepted 2 December 2011

Academic Editor: Carlos E. P. Corbett

Copyright © 2012 Bryan E. Hart and Richard I. Tapping. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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