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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 615745, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/615745
Clinical Study

Elevated Osteopontin Levels in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

1Department of Neurology, Bei Jing Daopei Hospital, Bei Jing 100749, China
2Department of Emergency, The Fourth Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China
3Department of Paediatrics, Daqing Oilfied General Hospital, Daqing 163311, China
4Department of Neurology, The First Affiliated Hospital of Harbin Medical University, Harbin 150001, China

Received 15 November 2012; Revised 30 January 2013; Accepted 14 February 2013

Academic Editor: Muzamil Ahmad

Copyright © 2013 Yuan Sun et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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