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Mediators of Inflammation
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 632049, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/632049
Research Article

Characterization of Macrophage Phenotypes in Three Murine Models of House-Dust-Mite-Induced Asthma

1Department of Pharmacokinetics, Toxicology and Targeting, Groningen Research Institute for Pharmacy, University of Groningen, Antonius Deusinglaan 1, 9713 AV Groningen, The Netherlands
2GRIAC Research Institute, University Medical Centre Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands
3Department of Pathology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, Hanzeplein 1, 9713 GZ Groningen, The Netherlands

Received 12 October 2012; Accepted 11 January 2013

Academic Editor: Chiou-Feng Lin

Copyright © 2013 Christina Draijer et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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