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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 340508, 20 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/340508
Review Article

Biomarkers in Multiple Sclerosis: An Up-to-Date Overview

Immunogenetics Laboratory, 1st Department of Neurology, Aeginition Hospital, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, 115 28 Athens, Greece

Received 17 October 2012; Revised 13 December 2012; Accepted 18 December 2012

Academic Editor: Jeroen Geurts

Copyright © 2013 Serafeim Katsavos and Maria Anagnostouli. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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