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Multiple Sclerosis International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 598093, 6 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/598093
Review Article

The Evidence for Hypoperfusion as a Factor in Multiple Sclerosis Lesion Development

1Department of Anatomy & Cell Biology, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK, Canada S7N 5E5
2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh 11533, Saudi Arabia

Received 7 November 2012; Revised 8 February 2013; Accepted 19 March 2013

Academic Editor: Bianca Weinstock-Guttman

Copyright © 2013 Bernhard H. J. Juurlink. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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