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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 60803, 33 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/60803
Review Article

The Temporal Dynamics Model of Emotional Memory Processing: A Synthesis on the Neurobiological Basis of Stress-Induced Amnesia, Flashbulb and Traumatic Memories, and the Yerkes-Dodson Law

1Medical Research Service, VA Hospital, Tampa 33612, FL, USA
2Department of Psychology, University of South Florida, Tampa 33620, FL, USA
3Department of Molecular Pharmacology and Physiology, University of South Florida, Tampa 33612, FL, USA

Received 28 July 2006; Revised 18 December 2006; Accepted 20 December 2006

Academic Editor: Georges Chapouthier

Copyright © 2007 David M. Diamond et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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