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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2007 (2007), Article ID 90163, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2007/90163
Research Article

Differential MR/GR Activation in Mice Results in Emotional States Beneficial or Impairing for Cognition

Gorlaeus Lab, Division of Medical Pharmacology, LACDR/LUMC, Leiden University, Einsteinweg 55, Leiden 2300, The Netherlands

Received 24 November 2006; Revised 1 February 2007; Accepted 5 February 2007

Academic Editor: Patrice Venault

Copyright © 2007 Vera Brinks et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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