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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2009 (2009), Article ID 730902, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2009/730902
Review Article

Progesterone Withdrawal-Evoked Plasticity of Neural Function in the Female Periaqueductal Grey Matter

Department of Physiology, University of Birmingham, Birmingham B15 2TT, UK

Received 30 May 2008; Accepted 30 July 2008

Academic Editor: Robert Adamec

Copyright © 2009 T. A. Lovick and A. J. Devall. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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