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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2011 (2011), Article ID 328602, 16 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2011/328602
Review Article

Histaminergic Mechanisms for Modulation of Memory Systems

1Programa de Pós-Graduação em Ciências Médicas, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Ramiro Barcelos 2400, 90035-903 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
2Centro de Memória, Instituto do Cérebro, Pontifícia Universidade Católica do Rio Grande do Sul, Ipiranga 6690, 90610-000 Porto Alegre, RS, Brazil
3Departamento de Farmácia, Universidade Estadual do Centro Oeste, Simeão Camargo de Sá 03, 85040-080 Guarapuava, PR, Brazil

Received 16 March 2011; Accepted 29 June 2011

Academic Editor: Anja Gundlfinger

Copyright © 2011 Cristiano André Köhler et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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