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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 131608, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/131608
Review Article

Age-Related Deficits of Dual-Task Walking: A Review

Institute of Physiology and Anatomy, German Sport University, Am Sportpark Müngersdorf 6, 50933 Cologne, Germany

Received 28 February 2012; Revised 8 May 2012; Accepted 27 May 2012

Academic Editor: Jennifer L. Bizon

Copyright © 2012 Rainer Beurskens and Otmar Bock. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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