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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 346053, 15 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/346053
Review Article

Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells to Model and Treat Neurogenetic Disorders

1Faculty of Medicine, University of Toronto, 1 King’s College Circle, Toronto, ON, Canada M5S 1A8
2Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, McMaster University, HSC 1R1, 1280 Main Street West, Hamilton, ON, Canada L8S 4K1

Received 4 March 2012; Accepted 30 May 2012

Academic Editor: Cara J. Westmark

Copyright © 2012 Hansen Wang and Laurie C. Doering. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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