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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 516364, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/516364
Review Article

The Adaptive Neuroplasticity Hypothesis of Behavioral Maintenance

Weill Cornell Medical College, Center for Integrative Medicine and the Division of Clinical Epidemiology and Evaluative Sciences Research, New York, NY 10065, USA

Received 30 July 2012; Revised 23 August 2012; Accepted 26 August 2012

Academic Editor: Michael Stewart

Copyright © 2012 Janey C. Peterson. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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