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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 581291, 8 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/581291
Review Article

Molecular Determinants of the Spacing Effect

1Department of Physiology, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4
2Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, Montreal Neurological Institute, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada H3A 2B4

Received 25 October 2011; Revised 16 December 2011; Accepted 16 January 2012

Academic Editor: Andrew Weeks

Copyright © 2012 Faisal Naqib et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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