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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 892749, 13 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/892749
Review Article

The Role of Deubiquitinating Enzymes in Synaptic Function and Nervous System Diseases

1Department of Biological Sciences, Butler University, 4600 Sunset Avenue, Indianapolis, IN 46208, USA
2Department of Molecular Physiology and Pharmacology, Tufts University School of Medicine, 150 Harrison Avenue, Boston, MA 02111, USA

Received 19 September 2012; Accepted 25 November 2012

Academic Editor: Yuji Ikegaya

Copyright © 2012 Jennifer R. Kowalski and Peter Juo. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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