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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 945373, 18 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/945373
Review Article

Cellular Signal Mechanisms of Reward-Related Plasticity in the Hippocampus

Department of Biomedicine, College of Biomedical Sciences and Health Professions, The University of Texas at Brownsville, 80 Fort Brown, Brownsville, TX 78520, USA

Received 8 August 2012; Revised 22 September 2012; Accepted 23 September 2012

Academic Editor: Michel Baudry

Copyright © 2012 Masako Isokawa. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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