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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 196848, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/196848
Review Article

Breaking It Down: The Ubiquitin Proteasome System in Neuronal Morphogenesis

Center for Neuroscience, University of California Davis, 1544 Newton Court, Davis, CA 95618, USA

Received 12 October 2012; Accepted 31 December 2012

Academic Editor: Michel Baudry

Copyright © 2013 Andrew M. Hamilton and Karen Zito. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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