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Neural Plasticity
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 753656, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/753656
Review Article

Microglia and Spinal Cord Synaptic Plasticity in Persistent Pain

Pain Signaling and Plasticity Laboratory, Departments of Anesthesiology and Neurobiology, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC 27710, USA

Received 7 May 2013; Accepted 8 July 2013

Academic Editor: Long-Jun Wu

Copyright © 2013 Sarah Taves et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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