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Nursing Research and Practice
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 568242, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/568242
Research Article

Psychosocial Well-Being in Persons with Aphasia Participating in a Nursing Intervention after Stroke

1Department of Nursing Science, Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Health and Society, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1130 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
2Department of Nursing and Mental Health, Faculty of Public Health, Hedmark University College, P.O. Box 400, 2418 Elverum, Norway
3Institute of Public Health, University of Århus, Nordre Ringgade 1, 8000 Århus C, Denmark
4Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Clinical Medicine, University of Oslo, P.O. Box 1171 Blindern, 0318 Oslo, Norway
5Department of Geriatric Medicine, Oslo University Hospital, P.O. Box 4956 Nydalen, 0424 Oslo, Norway

Received 19 March 2012; Accepted 10 May 2012

Academic Editor: Kim Usher

Copyright © 2012 Berit Arnesveen Bronken et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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