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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 312734, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/312734
Research Article

Attitudes toward Female Circumcision among Men and Women in Two Districts in Somalia: Is It Time to Rethink Our Eradication Strategy in Somalia?

1Department of Social Science, Oslo University College, 0167 Oslo, Norway
2Section for International Health, Department of General Practice and Community Medicine, University of Oslo, 0167 Oslo, Norway

Received 15 December 2012; Revised 1 March 2013; Accepted 2 April 2013

Academic Editor: R. Elise B. Johansen

Copyright © 2013 Abdi A. Gele et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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