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Obstetrics and Gynecology International
Volume 2013 (2013), Article ID 828165, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2013/828165
Research Article

Strategies for Molecularly Enhanced Chemotherapy to Achieve Synthetic Lethality in Endometrial Tumors with Mutant p53

1Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
2Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242, USA
3Gillette Center for Gynecological Oncology, Massachusetts General Hospital Cancer Center, Boston, MA 02114, USA

Received 31 May 2013; Accepted 10 October 2013

Academic Editor: Andrew P. Bradford

Copyright © 2013 Xiangbing Meng et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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