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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 217594, 9 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/217594
Research Article

Centrosome Aberrations Associated with Cellular Senescence and p53 Localization at Supernumerary Centrosomes

Division of Morphological Science, Biomedical Research Center, Saitama Medical University, 38 Morohongo, Moroyama, Iruma, Saitama 350-0495, Japan

Received 28 May 2012; Revised 27 August 2012; Accepted 11 September 2012

Academic Editor: William C. Burhans

Copyright © 2012 Susumu Ohshima. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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