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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 390385, 17 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/390385
Research Article

Coffee Polyphenols Change the Expression of STAT5B and ATF-2 Modifying Cyclin D1 Levels in Cancer Cells

1Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, School of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain
2Department of Nutrition and Food Science, School of Pharmacy, University of Barcelona, 08028 Barcelona, Spain

Received 10 February 2012; Revised 16 May 2012; Accepted 18 May 2012

Academic Editor: Luciano Pirola

Copyright © 2012 Carlota Oleaga et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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