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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 480895, 12 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/480895
Review Article

The Neglected Significance of “Antioxidative Stress”

1Laboratory of Oxidative Stress Research, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ljubljana, Zdravstvena pot 5, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia
2Institute of Pathophysiology, Faculty of Medicine, University of Ljubljana, Zaloska 4, SI-1000 Ljubljana, Slovenia

Received 18 January 2012; Accepted 17 February 2012

Academic Editor: Felipe Dal-Pizzol

Copyright © 2012 B. Poljsak and I. Milisav. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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