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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 608478, 14 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/608478
Review Article

ROS in Aging Caenorhabditis elegans: Damage or Signaling?

Laboratory for Aging Physiology and Molecular Evolution, Department of Biology, Ghent University, K. L. Ledeganckstraat 35, 9000 Ghent, Belgium

Received 16 May 2012; Accepted 3 July 2012

Academic Editor: Vitor Costa

Copyright © 2012 Patricia Back et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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