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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 680304, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/680304
Review Article

Growth Culture Conditions and Nutrient Signaling Modulating Yeast Chronological Longevity

1Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
2ICVS/3B's-PT Government Associate Laboratory, Life and Health Sciences Research Institute (ICVS), School of Health Sciences, University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal
3Department of Biology, Centre of Molecular and Environmental Biology (CBMA), University of Minho, 4710-057 Braga, Portugal

Received 1 June 2012; Accepted 10 July 2012

Academic Editor: Vitor Costa

Copyright © 2012 Júlia Santos et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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