About this Journal Submit a Manuscript Table of Contents
Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 697541, 10 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/697541
Research Article

Monocrotaline: Histological Damage and Oxidant Activity in Brain Areas of Mice

1Department of Physiology and Pharmacology, Faculty of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Rua Coronel Nunes de Melo, 1127-60430-270 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
2Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Federal University of Paraiba, João Pessoa 58051-970, PB, Brazil
3School of Medicine, University of Fortaleza (UNIFOR), Rua Desembargador Floriano Benevides Magalhães, 221 3° Andar, 60811-690 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
4Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Pharmacy, Odontology and Nursing, Federal University of Ceará, Rua Capitão Francisco Pedro 1210, 60431-327 Fortaleza, CE, Brazil
5Department of Morphology, School of Medicine, Federal University of Ceará, Rua Delmiro de Farias s/n, Rodolfo Teófilo, Fortaleza, 60416-030, CE, Brazil
6School of Pharmacy, University of Otago, P.O. Box 913, Dunedin 9016, New Zealand

Received 3 September 2012; Revised 30 October 2012; Accepted 31 October 2012

Academic Editor: Christopher Horst Lillig

Copyright © 2012 José Eduardo Ribeiro Honório Junior et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

Linked References

  1. R. J. Huxtable, “Activation and pulmonary toxicity of pyrrolizidine alkaloids,” Pharmacology and Therapeutics, vol. 47, no. 3, pp. 371–389, 1990. View at Scopus
  2. S. M. M. Vasconcelos, J. E. R. Honório-Júnior, R. N. D. C. Abreu, M. C. C. Silva, J. M. Barbosa-Filho, and R. F. G. Lobato, “Pharmacologic study of some plant species from the Brazilian Northeast: Calotropis procera Agava sisalana, Solanum paludosum, Dioscorea cayenensis and Crotalaria retusa,” in , Medicinal Plants: Classification, Biosynthesis and Pharmacology, A. Varela and J. Jasiah Ibanez, Eds., vol. 4, pp. 189–202, Nova Science, Hauppauge, NY, USA, 2009.
  3. C. Kosogof, J. J. Tepe, and R. M. Williams, “DNA cross-linking by a phototriggered pyrrolic progenitor developed from monocrotaline,” Tetrahedron Letters, vol. 42, no. 38, pp. 6641–6643, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  4. C. C. Yan and R. J. Huxtable, “Effects of taurine and guanidinoethane sulfonate on toxicity of the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline,” Biochemical Pharmacology, vol. 51, no. 3, pp. 321–329, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  5. F. E. Mingatto, D. J. Dorta, A. B. dos Santos et al., “Dehydromonocrotaline inhibits mitochondrial complex I. A potential mechanism accounting for hepatotoxicity of monocrotaline,” Toxicon, vol. 50, no. 5, pp. 724–730, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  6. A. C. de Souza, M. R. Hatayde, and G. H. Bechara, “Pathological aspects of poisoning by Crotalaria spectabilis (Fabaceae) seeds in swine,” Pesquisa Veterinaria Brasileira, vol. 17, no. 1, pp. 12–18, 1997. View at Scopus
  7. T. W. Petry, G. T. Bowden, R. J. Huxtable, and I. G. Sipes, “Characterization of hepatic DNA damage induced in rats by the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline,” Cancer Research, vol. 44, no. 4, pp. 1505–1509, 1984. View at Scopus
  8. A. L. Rose, C. A. Garden, J. D. McConnell, and L. B. Bull, “Field and experimental investigations of, “walk-about” disease of horses (Kimberly horse disease) in Northern Australia. Crotalaria poisoning in horses,” Australian Veterinary Journal, vol. 33, pp. 25–33, 1957.
  9. V. M. da Trindade Nobre, F. Riet-Correa, A. F. Dantas, J. M. Barbosa Filho, I. M. Tabosa, and J. S. Vasconcelos, “Poisoning by Crotalaria retusa (Fabaceae) in Equidae in the semiarid region of Paraíba,” Pesquisa Veterinaria Brasileira, vol. 24, no. 3, pp. 132–143, 2004. View at Scopus
  10. H. Sies and E. Cadenas, “Oxidative stress: damage to intact cells and organs,” Philosophical Transactions of the Royal Society, vol. 311, no. 1152, pp. 617–631, 1985.
  11. B. Joseph, V. Kumaran, E. Berishvili, K. K. Bhargava, C. J. Palestro, and S. Gupta, “Monocrotaline promotes transplanted cell engraftment and advances liver repopulation in rats via liver conditioning,” Hepatology, vol. 44, no. 6, pp. 1411–1420, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  12. Y. Morimatsu, N. Sakashita, Y. Komohara et al., “Development and characterization of an animal model of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension,” Journal of Vascular Research, vol. 49, no. 1, pp. 33–42, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  13. R. J. Huxtable, C. C. Yan, S. Wild, S. Maxwell, and R. Cooper, “Physicochemical and metabolic basis for the differing neurotoxicity of the pyrrolizidine alkaloids, trichodesmine and monocrotaline,” Neurochemical Research, vol. 21, no. 2, pp. 141–146, 1996. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  14. D. G. Graham, “Oxidative pathways for catecholamines in the genesis of neuromelanin and cytotoxic quinones,” Molecular Pharmacology, vol. 14, no. 4, pp. 633–643, 1978. View at Scopus
  15. B. Poljsak and I. Milisav, “The neglected significance of, ‘antioxidative stress’,” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2012, Article ID 480895, 12 pages, 2012.
  16. B. Halliwell and J. M. C. Gutteridge, Free Radicals in Biology and Medicine, 1999.
  17. L. L. Dugan and D. W. Choi, “Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and oxidative stress,” in Basic Neurochemistry: Molecular, Cellular and Medical Aspects, G. J. Siegel, B. W. Agranoff, E. W. Alberts, S. K. Fisher, and M. D. Uhler, Eds., pp. 722–723, Williams & Wilkins, Baltimore, Md, USA, 6th edition, 1999.
  18. C. M. Bergamini, S. Gambetti, A. Dondi, and C. Cervellati, “Oxygen, reactive oxygen species and tissue damage,” Current Pharmaceutical Design, vol. 10, no. 14, pp. 1611–1626, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  19. M. Gottlieb, R. Leal-Campanario, M. R. Campos-Esparza et al., “Neuroprotection by two polyphenols following excitotoxicity and experimental ischemia,” Neurobiology of Disease, vol. 23, no. 2, pp. 374–386, 2006. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  20. S. M. Aziz, M. Toborek, B. Hennig, E. Endean, and D. W. Lipke, “Polyamine regulatory processes and oxidative stress in monocrotaline-treated pulmonary artery endothelial cells,” Cell Biology International, vol. 21, no. 12, pp. 801–812, 1997. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  21. N. T. T. Huong, K. Matsumoto, R. Kasai, K. Yamasaki, and H. Watanabe, “In vitro antioxidant activity of Vietnamese ginseng saponin and its components,” Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin, vol. 21, no. 9, pp. 978–981, 1998. View at Scopus
  22. E. J. Barreiro, A. L. Pereira, L. N. L. F. Gomes , and J. R. Silva, “Carbon-13 nuclear magnetic resonance of pyrrolizidine alkaloids: a reassignment,” Journal of Chemical Research, pp. 330–331, 1980.
  23. D. L. Cheng, S. B. Tu, A. A. Enti, and E. Roder, “Occurrence of the pyrrolizidine alkaloid monocrotaline in Crotalaria assamica Benth. and Crotalaria calycina Schrank,” Scientia Pharmaceutica, vol. 54, no. 4, pp. 351–355, 1986. View at Scopus
  24. V. M. T. Nobre, A. F. M. Dantas, F. Riet-Correa, J. M. Barbosa Filho, I. M. Tabosa, and J. S. Vasconcelos, “Acute intoxication by Crotalaria retusa in sheep,” Toxicon, vol. 45, no. 3, pp. 347–352, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  25. E. Gilat, T. Kadar, A. Levy et al., “Anticonvulsant treatment of sarin-induced seizures with nasal midazolam: an electrographic, behavioral, and histological study in freely moving rats,” Toxicology and Applied Pharmacology, vol. 209, no. 1, pp. 74–85, 2005. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  26. S. M. Hsu and L. Raine, “Protein A, avidin, and biotin in immunohistochemistry,” Journal of Histochemistry and Cytochemistry, vol. 29, no. 11, pp. 1349–1353, 1981. View at Scopus
  27. A. C. Maehly and B. Chance, “The assay of catalases and peroxidases,” Methods of Biochemical Analysis, vol. 1, pp. 357–424, 1954. View at Scopus
  28. L. C. Green, S. R. Tannenbaum, and P. Goldman, “Nitrate synthesis in the germfree and conventional rat,” Science, vol. 212, no. 4490, pp. 56–58, 1981. View at Scopus
  29. O. H. Lowry, N. J. Rosebrough, A. L. Farr, and R. J. Randall, “Protein measurement with the Folin phenol reagent,” The Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 193, no. 1, pp. 265–275, 1951. View at Scopus
  30. M. R. Gardiner, R. Royce, and A. Bokora, “Studies on crotalaria crispata, a newly recognised cause of kimberley horse disease,” Journal of Pathology & Bacteriology, vol. 89, no. 1, pp. 43–55, 1965.
  31. B. P. S. Pitanga, V. D. A. Silva, C. S. Souza et al., “Assessment of neurotoxicity of monocrotaline, an alkaloid extracted from Crotalaria retusa in astrocyte/neuron co-culture system,” NeuroToxicology, vol. 32, no. 6, pp. 776–784, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  32. J. P. Silva-Neto, R. A. Barreto, B. P. S. Pitanga et al., “Genotoxicity and morphological changes induced by the alkaloid monocrotaline, extracted from Crotalaria retusa, in a model of glial cells,” Toxicon, vol. 55, no. 1, pp. 105–117, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  33. V. Crysns and J. Yuan, “The cutting edge: caspases in apoptosis and disease,” in When Cells Die, R. Lockshin, Z. zakeri, and J. Tilly, Eds., pp. 177–210, Wiley-Liss, New York, NY, USA, 1998.
  34. J. J. Kang, M. D. Schaber, S. M. Srinivasula et al., “Cascades of mammalian caspase activation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae,” Journal of Biological Chemistry, vol. 274, no. 5, pp. 3189–3198, 1999. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  35. G. A. C. Brito, J. Fujji, B. A. Carneiro-Filho, A. A. M. Lima, T. Obrig, and R. L. Guerrant, “Mechanism of Clostridium difficile toxin A-induced apoptosis in T84 cells,” Journal of Infectious Diseases, vol. 186, no. 10, pp. 1438–1447, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  36. E. E. Essick and F. Sam, “Oxidative stress and autophagy in cardiac disease, neurological disorders, aging and cancer,” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 3, no. 3, pp. 168–177, 2010. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  37. C. C. Aguiar, A. B. Almeida, P. V. Araujo et al., “Oxidative stress and epilepsy: literature review,” Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity, vol. 2012, Article ID 795259, 12 pages, 2012.
  38. K. Takuma, A. Baba, and T. Matsuda, “Astrocyte apoptosis: implications for neuroprotection,” Progress in Neurobiology, vol. 72, no. 2, pp. 111–127, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  39. F. Ng, M. Berk, O. Dean, and A. I. Bush, “Oxidative stress in psychiatric disorders: evidence base and therapeutic implications,” International Journal of Neuropsychopharmacology, vol. 11, no. 6, pp. 851–876, 2008. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  40. M. G. Naffah-Mazzacoratti, “Profile of prostaglandin levels in the rat hippocampus in pilocarpine model of epilepsy,” Neurochemistry International, vol. 27, no. 6, pp. 461–466, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  41. B. S. McEwen and R. M. Sapolsky, “Stress and cognitive function,” Current Opinion in Neurobiology, vol. 5, no. 2, pp. 205–216, 1995. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  42. M. I. Bellissimo, D. Amado, D. S. P. Abdalla, E. C. Ferreira, E. A. Cavalheiro, and M. G. Naffah-Mazzacoratti, “Superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase activities and the hydroperoxide concentration are modified in the hippocampus of epileptic rats,” Epilepsy Research, vol. 46, no. 2, pp. 121–128, 2001. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  43. S. S. Zoroǧlu, H. Herken, M. Yürekli et al., “The possible pathophysiological role of plasma nitric oxide and adrenomedullin in schizophrenia,” Journal of Psychiatric Research, vol. 36, no. 5, pp. 309–315, 2002. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar
  44. R. Garg and A. Kumar, “Possible role of citalopram and desipramine against sleep deprivation-induced anxiety like-behavior alterations and oxidative damage in mice,” Indian Journal of Experimental Biology, vol. 46, no. 11, pp. 770–776, 2008. View at Scopus
  45. F. T. Bonner and G. Stedman, “The chemistry of nitric oxide and redox-related species,” in Methods in Nitric Oxide Research, pp. 3–18, John Wiley & Sons, New York, NY, USA, 1996.
  46. F. T. Bonner, “Nitric oxide gas,” Methods in Enzymology, vol. 268, pp. 50–57, 1996. View at Scopus
  47. J. S. Beckman, “The double-edged role of nitric oxide in brain function and superoxide-mediated injury,” Journal of Developmental Physiology, vol. 15, no. 1, pp. 53–59, 1991. View at Scopus
  48. J. Fukuto and L. J. Ignarro, “In vivo aspects of nitric oxide (NO) chemistry: does peroxynitrite (-OONO) play a major role in cytotoxicity?” Accounts of Chemical Research, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 149–152, 1997.
  49. L. J. Ignarro, G. M. Buga, K. S. Wood, R. E. Byrns, and G. Chaudhuri, “Endothelium-derived relaxing factor produced and released from artery and vein is nitric oxide,” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America, vol. 84, no. 24, pp. 9265–9269, 1987. View at Scopus
  50. D. O. Barros, S. M. L. Xavier, C. O. Barbosa et al., “Effects of the vitamin E in catalase activities in hippocampus after status epilepticus induced by pilocarpine in Wistar rats,” Neuroscience Letters, vol. 416, no. 3, pp. 227–230, 2007. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  51. B. D. Watson, “Evaluation of the concomitance of lipid peroxidation in experimental models of cerebral ischemia and stroke,” Progress in Brain Research, vol. 96, pp. 69–95, 1993. View at Scopus
  52. M. Erecinska and I. A. Silver, “Calcium handling by hippocampal neurons under physiologic and pathologic conditions,” Advances in Neurology, vol. 71, pp. 119–136, 1996. View at Scopus
  53. A. M. Dymond and P. H. Crandall, “Oxygen availability and blood flow in the temporal lobes during spontaneous epileptic seizures in man,” Brain Research, vol. 102, no. 1, pp. 191–196, 1976. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  54. R. Verma and B. Nehru, “Effect of centrophenoxine against rotenone-induced oxidative stress in an animal model of Parkinson's disease,” Neurochemistry International, vol. 55, no. 6, pp. 369–375, 2009. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  55. V. Bashkatova, M. Alam, A. Vanin, and W. J. Schmidt, “Chronic administration of rotenone increases levels of nitric oxide and lipid peroxidation products in rat brain,” Experimental Neurology, vol. 186, no. 2, pp. 235–241, 2004. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  56. K. H. Lauritzen, C. Cheng, H. Wiksen, L. H. Bergersen, and A. Klungland, “Mitochondrial DNA toxicity compromises mitochondrial dynamics and induces hippocampal antioxidant defenses,” DNA Repair, vol. 10, no. 6, pp. 639–653, 2011. View at Publisher · View at Google Scholar · View at Scopus
  57. L. L. Dugan and J. S. Kim-Han, “Hypoxic-ischemic brain injury and oxidative stress,” in Basic Neurochemistry Molecular, Cellular, and Medical Aspects, G. J. Siegel, Ed., Elsevier/Academic Press, Burlington, Mass, USA, 2006.