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Oxidative Medicine and Cellular Longevity
Volume 2012 (2012), Article ID 707941, 11 pages
http://dx.doi.org/10.1155/2012/707941
Review Article

Does Vitamin C and E Supplementation Impair the Favorable Adaptations of Regular Exercise?

1Department of Physical Education and Sports Science at Serres, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 62110 Serres, Greece
2Department of Health, Exercise and Sport Sciences, University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, NM 87109, USA
3Centre for Physiological Medicine, Medical University of Graz, Harrachgasse 21/II, 8010 Graz, Austria
4Department of Health, Leisure, and Exercise Science, Appalachian State University, Boone, NC 28608, USA

Received 1 April 2012; Revised 18 June 2012; Accepted 20 June 2012

Academic Editor: Felipe Dal-Pizzol

Copyright © 2012 Michalis G. Nikolaidis et al. This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License, which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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